Pushing the Envelope

I don’t know where the phrase, “pushing the envelope” originated but it’s something that I’ve been doing for the past few weeks. I love to eat, but most especially, I love to eat sweets. Since thanksgiving, I’ve been eating pies, cakes, and candies. I’m not supposed to eat these things because I have acid reflux.

It started out slowly—just a bite or two, then to a small slice or tiny handful, then to several servings or a full bag.  Some days I can eat chocolates with no problems and that only makes it easier for me to “push the envelope” to eat more until I end up with a horrible burning sensation in the pit of my stomach.

I think all of us try to push the envelope in some way—it might not be sweets or chocolates, but it is a source of temptation. It is something that we know we shouldn’t do, but we try a little and when it looks like “it’s safe” we go even further; then we go too far and get “burnt.”

I’m trying to focus on these Scripture verses this morning, 1 Corinthians 10:23 and 13,

“You say, “I am allowed to do anything”—but not everything is good for you. You say, “I am allowed to do anything”—but not everything is beneficial… The temptations in your life are no different from what others experience. And God is faithful. He will not allow the temptation to be more than you can stand. When you are tempted, he will show you a way out so that you can endure” (NLT).

The fact is, all of us are tempted by something and instead of dabbling in the temptation and “pushing the envelope,” we should throw away the things that tempts us and put even more focus on God.

I don’t like to waste anything, but I think I will throw away that chocolate bar I bought at an “after-Christmas” sale— “So if your eye—even your good eye—causes you to lust, gouge it out and throw it away…” (Matt 5:29, NLT).

How are you “pushing the envelope” and what are you going to do to stop it?

Copyright © 2015 Dr. M. Teresa Trascritti

Be steadfast

I ran today. I was hoping to run/jog about 9 miles. During my workout I kept thinking about the idea of being “steadfast.” I think of “steadfast” as sticking to something—even if you mess up, you keep going. First Corinthians 15:58 says, “Therefore, my beloved brethren, be steadfast, immovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, knowing that your toil is not in vain in the Lord” (NASB).

Even though the passage doesn’t refer to running, I can apply the basic principle—“be steadfast… knowing that your toil is not in vain”—to me this means, keep going… your hard work will result in something positive.  I applied the Scripture verse for running, but I can also use it for my Christian growth.  I have not become the Christian that I want to be yet. I might say something or do something that I will regret, but I have to give it to God and keep pressing forward.

Today I ran 10.25 miles—I read the Bible this morning and prayed.

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Be steadfast in all that you do.

Copyright © 2013 M. Teresa Trascritti