The Truth About “Fifty Shades of Grey”

I never thought there would be a day when sado-masochism would be considered “romantic,” but it has happened with “Fifty Shades of Grey.” What makes this storyline so appealing to people? Is this really the type of relationship women secretly want? Would the lead female character endure these sexual games if the main character wasn’t a rich guy?

“Romance” has progressively been redefined over the last few decades. My idea of romance came from Disney movies like “Cinderella” or “Sleeping Beauty,” but when I was a teenager, the big “romance” movie was “Endless Love,” basically a warped Shakespearean love story about two teens who have sex and encounter tragedies in their lives. Then, when I was a young adult the romance movie was “Pretty Woman,” a story about a prostitute and her rich client falling in love with one another. Seeing this progression, it makes sense that society would consider “Fifty Shades of Grey” as “romantic.”

In a world where there is no real moral standard, “romance” or “love” can be anything. The truth is that the people who are enthralled by “Fifty Shades of Grey” have a miserable existence— they have no real purpose for living. They gravitate to a twisted “love” story because they desperately want to escape reality, and the storyline is so void of realism that it pacifies their need to forget about their own lives.

The real issue isn’t about sado-masochism disguised as “love,” but an internal emptiness that people generally feel. The popularity of “Fifty Shades of Grey” is a symptom of a greater issue— the need for God. Only God can fill human emptiness by giving people a true purpose for living and providing them with a new outlook on life. An invitation is given to all: “Come to me with your ears wide open. Listen, and you will find life… Oh, that you would choose life… You can make this choice by loving the Lord your God, obeying him, and committing yourself firmly to him. This is the key to your life…” (Isa 55:3, Deu 30:19-20). Now, get a life!

Copyright © 2015 Dr. M. Teresa Trascritti

Personal mission

My husband and I was at a 5-day conference a couple of weeks ago. On one of the days we looked at the importance of a personal mission statement. I knew that it was important for a company to have a mission statement, but I didn’t realize that we should have our own mission statement too.

My mission statement (although I never referred to it as that before) was to, “help people grow in their relationship with Christ.” In fact, I discovered it was the first sentence in the “About Me” section of my blog site.

Recently, I was offered an online adjunct position with a secular college after an acquaintance referred me. I have taught part-time at several Christian colleges but this would be my first non-Christian school. I went through the three week training and was assigned my first class (it starts in mid-May).

The whole time that I was filling out my paperwork, going through training, and waiting on my class to start, I kept wondering what my purpose was in teaching there. I tried to convince myself that God opened this door and that I could “witness” to non-believers there, but something didn’t seem right to me.

Today I thought about my personal mission statement—“to help people grow in their relationship with Christ” and I realized that this school didn’t fit my mission statement.

Proverbs 4:25-27 says, “Look straight ahead, and fix your eyes… Mark out a straight path for your feet… Don’t get sidetracked…” (NLT). Yes, it would be good to teach at another school, but if my main reason for teaching is to help people grow in their relationship with Christ, then this was not the right place to do that.

I wonder how many things we do that distract us from our personal mission—things we convince ourselves to do that turns into a distraction? We need less distraction in our lives.

What’s your personal mission?

Copyright © 2014 Dr. M. Teresa Trascritti